Parent-child relationships and interracial first union formation in the United States

Citation

Yahirun, Jenjira J. & Kroeger, Rhiannon A. (2019). Parent-child relationships and interracial first union formation in the United States. Advances in Life Course Research.

Abstract

The family of origin was once considered an important “third party” in shaping offspring romantic relationships. However, the growing independence of young adults suggests that parents today may have less control over children’s union formation. This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to explore how parent-child relationships affect first entry into same-race versus interracial unions. Results suggest that strong relationships with parents during adolescence decrease the risk of entering an interracial first union relative to a same-race first union or no union at all. However, differences with respect to marriage and cohabitation are apparent. Strong intergenerational ties decrease the probability of an interracial first cohabiting union compared to a same-race cohabiting union. Yet, close family relationships increase the chances of a same-race first marriage, but have no bearing on interracial marriage. These findings highlight how families remain racially and ethnically homogeneous over time.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.alcr.2019.100307

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Advances in Life Course Research

Author(s)

Yahirun, Jenjira J.
Kroeger, Rhiannon A.

Year Published

2019

DOI

10.1016/j.alcr.2019.100307

Reference ID

8517