Who is really doing it? Peer embeddedness and substance use during adolescence

Citation

Kramer, Rory A. & Vaquera, Elizabeth (2011). Who is really doing it? Peer embeddedness and substance use during adolescence. Sociological Perspectives. vol. 54 (1) pp. 37-58

Abstract

Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 15,355), this article examines the relationship between adolescent embeddedness and substance use. Unlike most previous work on substance use, the authors focus on the size of an individual's social network (embeddedness) instead of the characteristics of individuals in that network. They examine four levels of embeddedness (isolated, marginal, typical, and saturated) and the variation in their link to substance use, specifically alcohol consumption, binge drinking, cigarette smoking, and marijuana smoking. Students with high in-school embeddedness were significantly more likely to participate in risk behaviors involving alcohol while students with no in-school embeddedness are protected from risk behaviors by their social isolation. The study then argues for future research in substance use and peer effects that explores the interplay between measures of social capital and embeddedness.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1525%2Fsop.2011.54.1.37

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Sociological Perspectives

Author(s)

Kramer, Rory A.
Vaquera, Elizabeth

Year Published

2011

Volume Number

54

Issue Number

1

Pages

37-58

DOI

10.1525/sop.2011.54.1.37

Reference ID

1342