Stress trajectories, health behaviors, and the mental health of black and white young adults

Citation

Boardman, Jason D. & Alexander, Kari B. (2011). Stress trajectories, health behaviors, and the mental health of black and white young adults. Social Science and Medicine. vol. 72 (10) pp. 1659-1666 , PMCID: PMC3097293

Abstract

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine the mental health of non-Hispanic black and white young adults in the US. We use latent growth curve modeling to characterize the typical stress trajectories experienced by black and white young adults spanning the bulk of their lives. We identify the following four stress trajectories: 1) relatively stress free; 2) stress peak at age 15 and a subsequent decline; 3) stress peak at age 17 and a subsequent decline; and 4) a moderately high chronic stress. Results indicate that black adolescents have significantly higher risk of being in all three of the stressful classes compared to white adolescents. Stress exposure is strongly associated with depression and the race differences in stress profiles account for a modest amount of the observed race differences in mental health. We do not observe any race differences in behavioral responses to stressors; black youth are no more likely than white youth to engage in poor health behaviors (e.g., smoking, drinking, or obesity) in response to stress. We provide tentative support for the notion that poor health behaviors partially reduce the association between stress and depression for blacks but not whites. These findings contribute to unresolved issues regarding mental and physical health disparities among blacks and whites.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016%2Fj.socscimed.2011.03.024

Keyword(s)

Trajectories Mental health Stress

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Social Science and Medicine

Author(s)

Boardman, Jason D.
Alexander, Kari B.

Year Published

2011

Volume Number

72

Issue Number

10

Pages

1659-1666

DOI

10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.03.024

PMCID

PMC3097293

NIHMSID

NIHMS287095

Reference ID

1346