Neighborhood social disorganization and the acquisition of trichomoniasis among young adults in the United States

Citation

Ford, Jodi L. & Browning, Christopher R. (2011). Neighborhood social disorganization and the acquisition of trichomoniasis among young adults in the United States. American Journal of Public Health. vol. 101 (9) pp. 1696-1703 , PMCID: PMC3154224

Abstract

Objective

To examine relationships between neighborhood social disorganization and trichomoniasis among young adults in the U.S.
Methods

Multilevel logistic regression modeling was employed using secondary data from Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (2001-2002). The dependent variable –trichomoniasis was measured via urine testing. Neighborhood social disorganization was measured via 4 indicators from the 2000 U.S. Census: racial and ethnic composition, concentrated poverty and residential instability. The sample was comprised of 11,370 individuals across 4,912 neighborhoods.
Results

Trichomoniasis was more likely to occur in neighborhoods with higher concentrations of Black residents (AOR=1.16, 95% CI=1.03, 1.30). However, this association was mediated by neighborhood concentrated poverty. Furthermore, young adults who lived in neighborhoods with higher concentrations of poverty were significantly more likely to have trichomoniasis (AOR=1.25, 95% CI=1.07, 1.46). Neither immigrant concentration nor residential instability was significantly associated with trichomoniasis.
Conclusions

These findings strengthen the evidence that neighborhood structural conditions are associated with individual STI acquisition. Research is needed to explore the mechanisms through which these conditions influence STI. In addition, STI prevention programs that include structural interventions targeting neighborhood disadvantage are needed.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300213

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

American Journal of Public Health

Author(s)

Ford, Jodi L.
Browning, Christopher R.

Year Published

2011

Volume Number

101

Issue Number

9

Pages

1696-1703

DOI

10.2105/AJPH.2011.300213

PMCID

PMC3154224

NIHMSID

NIHMS457437

Reference ID

1414