Body Image Distortions, Weight, and Depression in Adolescent Boys: Longitudinal Trajectories Into Adulthood

Citation

Blashill, A. J. & Wilhelm, S. (2014). Body Image Distortions, Weight, and Depression in Adolescent Boys: Longitudinal Trajectories Into Adulthood. Psychology of Men and Masculinity. vol. 15 (4) pp. 445-451 , PMCID: PMC4219600

Abstract

Depressive symptoms are common among the U.S. population, yet research into prospective risk factors of depression among men is limited. Distorted body image is also prevalent among adolescent boys, and may be linked with elevated depression; however, longitudinal associations have rarely been measured. Thus, the aim of the current study was to assess the prospective relationship between forms of body image distortion and depressive symptoms among adolescent boys, into adulthood. Data were extracted from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Participants were 2,139 U.S. adolescent boys (M age = 16) who were followed prospectively over 13 years (1996 to 2009), into adulthood. Longitudinal mixed-level modeling was used to assess the temporal prediction of body image distortion on symptoms of depression. Results revealed that boys who were average weight and viewed themselves as either very underweight (very underweight distorted; Cohen's d = .47) or overweight (overweight distorted; Cohen's d = .29) reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms compared to boys who accurately viewed their weight as average; this effect remained constant over the 13-year study period. These findings indicated that distortions in body image, particularly extreme distortions, are risk factors for elevated depressive symptoms among adolescent boys, and persist into early adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037%2Fa0034618

Notes

Export Date: 7 January 2014

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Psychology of Men and Masculinity

Author(s)

Blashill, A. J.
Wilhelm, S.

Year Published

2014

Volume Number

15

Issue Number

4

Pages

445-451

ISSN/ISBN

15249220 (ISSN)

DOI

10.1037/a0034618

PMCID

PMC4219600

NIHMSID

NIHMS579294

Reference ID

4793