American indians, substance use, and sexual behavior: do predictors of sexually transmitted infections explain the race gap among young adults?

Citation

Eitle, D.; Greene, K.; & Eitle, T. M. (2015). American indians, substance use, and sexual behavior: do predictors of sexually transmitted infections explain the race gap among young adults?. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. vol. 42 (2) pp. 64-7 , PMCID: Pmc4295642

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In this study, we examined whether substance use and risky sexual behaviors predicted sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among American Indian (AI) and white young adults. Furthermore, we explored whether these factors explained the race disparity in STIs. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of wave 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health collected in 2001 to 2002. Young adult participants (aged 18-26 years) provided urine specimens that were tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis infection. Estimates of the association between AI with any STI were adjusted for sexual and other risk behavior correlates using multivariate regression techniques. RESULTS: Nine percent of AIs (n = 367) and 3.6% of whites (n = 7813) tested positive for an STI. Race differences were found for substance use (injection drug use, 3.1% AI vs. 1.3% white; alcohol use frequency, 2.01% AI vs. 2.5% white; binge drinking frequency, 1.25% AI vs. 1.53% white). Among sexually active respondents, AIs were more likely to have paid for sex (9%) than whites (3%). After adjustment, early sexual initiation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.41), no condom use at last sex (adjusted odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.01), and AI race (adjusted odds ratio, 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.46-4.11) were significantly associated with having an STI. CONCLUSIONS: Individual-level sexual and other risk behaviors do not fully explain disparities in STIs among AIs compared with white young adults. Further examination of network and community factors is needed to explain these disparities.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1097%2Folq.0000000000000230

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Author(s)

Eitle, D.
Greene, K.
Eitle, T. M.

Year Published

2015

Volume Number

42

Issue Number

2

Pages

64-7

Edition

2015/01/15

DOI

10.1097/olq.0000000000000230

PMCID

Pmc4295642

NIHMSID

Nihms642922

Reference ID

5406