Variation in the Protective Effect of Higher Education against Depression

Citation

Bauldry, Shawn (2015). Variation in the Protective Effect of Higher Education against Depression. Society and Mental Health. vol. 5 (2) pp. 145-161

Abstract

Numerous studies document that higher education is associated with a reduced likelihood of depression. The protective effects of higher education, however, are known to vary across population subgroups. This study tests competing theories for who is likely to obtain a greater protective benefit from a college degree against depression through an analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health and recently developed methods for analyzing heterogeneous treatment effects involving the use of propensity scores. The analysis examines how the effects of two “treatments” (at least some college education and attaining at least a four-year college degree) on latent depressive symptomology vary by background disadvantage, as indicated by having a low propensity for completing some college or attaining a four-year college degree. Results indicate that people from disadvantaged backgrounds realize a greater protective effect of higher education, either completing some college or attaining a four-year degree, against depressive symptomology than people from advantaged backgrounds. This pattern is more pronounced for people who attain at least a four-year degree than for people who complete at least some college education.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177%2F2156869314564399

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Society and Mental Health

Author(s)

Bauldry, Shawn

Year Published

2015

Volume Number

5

Issue Number

2

Pages

145-161

DOI

10.1177/2156869314564399

Reference ID

5412