Association Between Legal Performance-Enhancing Substances and Use of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids in Young Adults

Citation

Nagata, Jason M.; Ganson, Kyle T.; Gorrell, Sasha; Mitchison, Deborah; & Murray, Stuart B. (2020). Association Between Legal Performance-Enhancing Substances and Use of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids in Young Adults. JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract

Anabolic-androgenic steroids are schedule III drugs that are often used without a prescription to increase muscle mass and tone for appearance or performance enhancement. Use of anabolic-androgenic steroids is associated with negative physiological (eg, cardiovascular, neuroendocrine, musculoskeletal, and renal) health outcomes. Anabolic-androgenic steroids are also associated with mood and substance-use disorders, aggression, and violence. The use of anabolic-androgenic steroids is frequently observed among adolescents in the United States and is more prevalent among adolescent boys (3.3% of boys reporting use) compared with adolescent girls (2.4% of girls reporting use) nationwide. Although the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids is cross-sectionally associated with legal performance-enhancing substances, including creatine monohydrate, there is a paucity of longitudinal data determining predictors of anabolic-androgenic steroid use. Here, we examine the longitudinal association between legal performance-enhancing substances and subsequent use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in a population-based cohort of young adults. We hypothesized that legal performance-enhancing substance use in young adulthood would be associated with subsequent anabolic-androgenic steroid use at 7-year follow-up.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0883

Keyword(s)

steroids

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

JAMA Pediatrics

Author(s)

Nagata, Jason M.
Ganson, Kyle T.
Gorrell, Sasha
Mitchison, Deborah
Murray, Stuart B.

Year Published

2020

ISSN/ISBN

2168-6203

DOI

10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0883

Reference ID

6131