Does School Desegregation Promote Diverse Interactions? An Equilibrium Model of Segregation within Schools

Citation

Mele, A. (2020). Does School Desegregation Promote Diverse Interactions? An Equilibrium Model of Segregation within Schools. American Economic Journal-Economic Policy. vol. 12 (2) pp. 228-257

Abstract

This paper studies racial segregation in schools using data on student friendships from Add Health. I estimate an equilibrium model of friendship formation, with preferences allowing both homophily and heterophily in direct and indirect ties. I find that homophily goes beyond direct links: students also prefer racially homogeneous indirect friends, while there is heterophily in income. I simulate policies reallocating students across schools. Race-based policies have nonlinear effects on within-school segregation and other network features such as clustering and centrality. Policies increasing diversity through reallocations based on income have less impact on racial segregation.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1257/pol.20170604

Keyword(s)

SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

Notes

ISI Document Delivery No.: LK5DL Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 64 Mele, Angelo Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) [P01-HD31921] This research uses data from Add Health, a program project designed by J. Richard Udry, Peter S. Bearman, and Kathleen Mullan Harris and funded by a grant -P01-HD31921 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development with cooperative funding from 17 other agencies. Special acknowledgment is due to Ronald R. Rindfuss and Barbara Entwisle for their assistance in the original design. Persons interested in obtaining data files from Add Health should contact Add Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, 123 W. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC -27516-2524 (addhealth@unc.edu). No direct support was received from grant -P01-HD31921 for this analysis. 0 AMER ECONOMIC ASSOC NASHVILLE

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

American Economic Journal-Economic Policy

Author(s)

Mele, A.

Year Published

2020

Volume Number

12

Issue Number

2

Pages

228-257

ISSN/ISBN

1945-7731

DOI

10.1257/pol.20170604

Reference ID

6503