Comparing Adolescents in Diverging Family Structures: Investigating Whether Adoptees are More Prone to Problems than Their Nonadopted Peers

Citation

Feigelman, W. (2001). Comparing Adolescents in Diverging Family Structures: Investigating Whether Adoptees are More Prone to Problems than Their Nonadopted Peers. Adoption Quarterly. vol. 5 (2) pp. 5-37

Abstract

This paper investigates whether adoptees are more prone to problems than their nonadopted peers. To illuminate this question another known higher problem risk-group was included: children living with one biological parent. Based on data collected from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, adoptees living in two-parent families (N = 369) were contrasted with children living in two-parent biologic families (N = 9,676) and with children living with one biological parent in step- or single-parent families (N = 7,457). As expected, adolescents living in step- and single-parent families showed far more adjustment difficulties than the other two subgroups. Adoptees showed behavior patterns much like those raised in two-parent biological families, except for three differences: they were more likely to run away from home, to get counseling help and to show less desire to attend college. The implications of these findings are discussed.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J145v05n02_02

Keyword(s)

Adoption

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Adoption Quarterly

Author(s)

Feigelman, W.

Year Published

2001

Volume Number

5

Issue Number

2

Pages

5-37

ISSN/ISBN

1092-6755

DOI

10.1300/J145v05n02_02

Reference ID

67