Trajectories of binge drinking differentially mediate associations between adolescent violence exposure and subsequent adjustment in young adulthood

Citation

Oosterhoff, Benjamin; Kaplow, Julie B.; & Layne, Christopher M. (2016). Trajectories of binge drinking differentially mediate associations between adolescent violence exposure and subsequent adjustment in young adulthood. Translational Issues in Psychological Science. vol. 2 (4) pp. 371-381

Abstract

Violence exposure in adolescence can disrupt ongoing adjustment, yet few studies have examined potential mechanisms that can explain these effects. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we examined associations among adolescent violence exposure and indicators of adjustment in young adulthood, and tested whether maladaptive trajectories of binge drinking could mediate these associations. Adolescents (N = 3,342; Mage = 16.09) reported on their violence exposure and binge drinking in an initial assessment (Wave 1). Adolescents were subsequently reassessed for binge drinking at 1 (Wave 2) and 6 years (Wave 3) post, and completed measures of adjustment (education, physical health, life satisfaction, depression, and delinquency) at 6 years post (Wave 3). Latent growth mixture modeling revealed 4 binge drinking trajectories: High Increasers (low baseline, large positive slope), Adolescence Elevated (high baseline, negative slope), Mid-Tier Stable (midlevel baseline, flat slope), and Slight Increasers (low baseline, small positive slope). Violence exposure was indirectly associated with (a) lower educational attainment and greater delinquency through an increased likelihood of being in the Adolescence Elevated binge drinking class, (b) lower life satisfaction through an increased likelihood of being in the High Increasers binge drinking class, and (c) worse physical heath through an increased likelihood of being in the Mid-Tier Stable binge drinking class. Violence-exposed adolescents may exhibit varying trajectories of binge drinking that carry differential risks for adverse outcomes, and disrupt adjustment during the transition to young adulthood. Implications for intervention and theory are discussed.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tps0000092

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Translational Issues in Psychological Science

Author(s)

Oosterhoff, Benjamin
Kaplow, Julie B.
Layne, Christopher M.

Year Published

2016

Volume Number

2

Issue Number

4

Pages

371-381

DOI

10.1037/tps0000092

Reference ID

7222