Self-reported male-female differences in criminal involvement do not account for criminal justice processing differences

Citation

Beaver, Kevin M. & Wright, John Paul (2019). Self-reported male-female differences in criminal involvement do not account for criminal justice processing differences. American Journal of Criminal Justice.

Abstract

Disparities between males and females in criminal behavior have been widely documented. Despite the extensive amount of research examining sex differences in criminal and analogous behaviors, there is no consensus on whether self-reported misbehavior accounts for the large sex differences found in all phases of the criminal justice system. The current study explores whether, and to what degree, self-reported misconduct accounts for male-female differences. To do so, data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) were analyzed. Consistent with prior research, the results revealed statistically significant and substantively large male-female differences in being arrested, pleading guilty, being sentenced to probation, and being incarcerated. These disparities were unaffected by self-reports of lifetime violent behavior, lifetime non-violent behavior, low self-control, IQ, parental socialization, and social support.

URL

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12103-019-09488-2

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

American Journal of Criminal Justice

Author(s)

Beaver, Kevin M.
Wright, John Paul

Year Published

2019

Edition

May 23, 2019

ISSN/ISBN

1936-1351

DOI

10.1007/s12103-019-09488-2

Reference ID

7243