Does Having Children Moderate the Effect of Child Sexual Abuse on Depression?

Citation

Zeglin, R. J.; DeRaedt, M. R.; & Lanthier, R. P. (2015). Does Having Children Moderate the Effect of Child Sexual Abuse on Depression?. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse. vol. 24 (6) pp. 607-26

Abstract

Nearly 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys under the age of 18 will be the victim of child sexual abuse. As adults, these individuals are more likely to report myriad mental illnesses including depression. Testing the hypothesis that having children would moderate the depressive effects of child sexual abuse, the authors used public-use data of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health Wave IV (n = 5,114; mean age = 29.00 years; SD = 1.78). Results indicate that having children significantly moderates the relationship between child sexual abuse and depression for females. Though the risk of depression is increased for all females with a child sexual abuse history, this increase is less dramatic for mothers. Two potential explanations of this effect are presented: biological and psychosocial. The possible implications for mental health professionals working with mothers with a child sexual abuse history include highlighting the role of their children as possible support.

URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26340070

Keyword(s)

child sexual abuse depression motherhood parenting women

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

Author(s)

Zeglin, R. J.
DeRaedt, M. R.
Lanthier, R. P.

Year Published

2015

Volume Number

24

Issue Number

6

Pages

607-26

ISSN/ISBN

1053-8712

DOI

10.1080/10538712.2015.1057664

Reference ID

7772