Social class, family formation, and delinquency in early adulthood

Citation

Kuhl, Danielle C.; Chavez, Jorge M.; Swisher, Raymond R.; & Wilczak, Andrew (2016). Social class, family formation, and delinquency in early adulthood. Sociological Perspectives. vol. 59 (2) pp. 345-367

Abstract

Recent research suggests increasing heterogeneity in the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. This study considers how this heterogeneity may influence delinquency between these two developmental periods. We focus on the role of family transitions, educational attainment, and employment in predicting risk of nonviolent delinquency and substance use, as well as disparities in transitions across socioeconomic status subgroups. Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). We find that family and neighborhood advantage are negatively associated with transitions into marriage, cohabitation, and parenthood, yet positively associated with educational attainment. In addition, adolescent family and neighborhood advantage are associated with a continuation of delinquent behavior and substance use during early adulthood. In multivariate analyses, accounting for family transitions in early adulthood largely attenuates the relationship between neighborhood advantage in adolescence and delinquency in early adulthood. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for developmental criminology.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177%2F0731121415586635

Keyword(s)

delinquency

Reference Type

Journal Article

Journal Title

Sociological Perspectives

Author(s)

Kuhl, Danielle C.
Chavez, Jorge M.
Swisher, Raymond R.
Wilczak, Andrew

Year Published

2016

Volume Number

59

Issue Number

2

Pages

345-367

Edition

July 14, 2015

DOI

10.1177/0731121415586635

NIHMSID

NIHMS729535

Reference ID

7895