Network structure and victimization: Examining the role of peer commitment

Citation

Solomon, Starr & Schwartz, Joseph A. (2016). Network structure and victimization: Examining the role of peer commitment. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. New Orleans, LA.

Abstract

Previous research on adolescent network structure suggests that various network characteristics insulate adolescents from victimization. Directly in line with these findings, previous studies have also revealed that individuals nested within dense friendship networks experienced greater levels of guardianship, which, in turn, reduced the overall risk of victimization. Despite these contributions, research has yet to explore whether the strength of ties among network members effectively moderates the protective effects of network characteristics on victimization. More specifically, the protective features of various network characteristics may be enhanced or dampened based on the individual level characteristics of members comprising each group. The current study examines the potential moderating effects of peer commitment on the association between the structure of adolescent peer networks and victimization risk using peer network data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). Initial patterns of results revealed that individual level characteristics of peer group members effectively moderated the association between various network characteristics and the risk of victimization. The methodological and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed in more detail.

Reference Type

Conference proceeding

Book Title

Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology

Author(s)

Solomon, Starr
Schwartz, Joseph A.

Year Published

2016

City of Publication

New Orleans, LA

Reference ID

8004