A categorization of adolescents’ dietary intake data in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health

Citation

Gray, Heewon & Fullwood, Dottington (2017). A categorization of adolescents’ dietary intake data in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior 50th Annual Conference. Washington, DC: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract

Objective The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a survey study with a nationally representative sample of high school youth with four follow-ups, yet dietary variables in previous studies have been used inconsistently. The objective of this study was to determine categories of dietary variables in Add Health. Study Design, Setting, Participants Cross-sectional secondary analysis study, using Add Health data with nationally representative sample. Participants were 14,738 students from 132 schools (Wave II). Outcome Measures and Analysis An extensive list of food items were extracted from the Wave II survey questions (1996) that included daily yes/no intake responses on 56 food items and four weekly frequency questions. Twenty questions asked types of food or preparation style (i.e. fried). Analysis consisted of recoded mutually exclusive food items specified by type. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and correlation coefficients were used. Results The analysis yielded 16 unique food item categories that included and combined low-fat/diet options into one: fruits, vegetables, beans/nuts, sugar-sweetened beverages, diet beverages, processed-packaged snacks, fast food, fish/seafood, other protein sources, bread/rice/other starch, butter/other fat, dairy and low-fat foods. Single-item weekly frequency questions were significantly correlated with food categories, but the coefficients were low (r<0.03; p < 0.05). Further factor analysis indicated that there were two main food components: healthy foods and unhealthy high-fat/junk foods. Conclusions and Implications The results from this study may allow for more comprehensive analysis to determine relationships between dietary categories and other outcome variables such as weight status.

URL

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2017.05.287

Reference Type

Conference proceeding

Book Title

Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior 50th Annual Conference

Author(s)

Gray, Heewon
Fullwood, Dottington

Year Published

2017

Volume Number

49

Publisher

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

City of Publication

Washington, DC

ISSN/ISBN

1499-4046

DOI

10.1016/j.jneb.2017.05.287

Reference ID

9207